FMEA gas generator

The car was a Skoda pickup.

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Engine? 1.3L Skoda or 1.6L VW.

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The one I sent the number to the inspector was a 1.6a.
But I would like a car that I can pull a little more with, this I can only pull 750kg with.

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The 1.6 VW has turnable dist but unforunately a plastic intake :pensive:

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Is there a lot of soot in the intake tube?
How often do you have to clean it?

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The throttle plate and the housing right next to it get the most buildup. I put the torch to it maybe every 2,000 km or whenever soot starts to interfere and I have a hard time keeping my idle down.

This is looking into the intake this summer when I dismanteled the throttle body.

Edit: At 11 o’clock in the left runner you can see soot starting to flake off. This is what we try to avoid by burning the intake every now and then. Different engines respond differently when flakes enter the intake valves. From what I’ve heard the 318 V8 likes to backfire, the Mazda makes valve/rocker arm noice but the Rabbit could swallow anything without even a burp.

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Found a description of a wood carburetor. when looking for what Hearth size I should use.
It is admittedly in Swedish, but you have to translate with the help of google.
I looked at my Iller 1.5 liter 65 horses, and got it to about 70mm?

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Thanks, Jan. Some really sweet drawings at the back of that book!! :smiley:

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I am looking for a car that I can afford for a gas test, I have looked at the Chevrolet S10 4x4 v6a year model around 1996.
Anyone know the weaknesses of such?

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Hello JanA,
A now recently died DOW member named Mike LaRosa did woodgas both an early TBI Chevy S10 four cylinder. (not enough power)Then upgraded gasified a 1998 S10 V-6 SEFI.
Use the magnify glass search tool above and search as Mike LaRosa Chevy to read his across many topics scattered about use impressions.
Regards
Steve Unruh

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I have never own a s10, but I was locking for one with short cab (could not find one) and what I did understand was that the four wheel drive was vacuum operated and this was common to not work and the fuel economi of the v6 was not great, about the same as the fullsize pickups.

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If its the 4.3 ltr might work ok, If its that 2.8 I dont know if it would work all that well, they are not all that good running on gasoline let alone woodgas. lol.

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If it is that 2.8 ltr you could drop a 3.8 rear wheel drive engine in its place. The later gen 2 and 3 engine have lots of torque and I bet would run great on woodgas.

I have an 06 Cadillac with the 3.6 ltr I might be able to get for my S-10. The S-10 was sort of a joke back in the day. Now they are desirable and to be honest they are pretty solid little trucks.

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The Second gen s10 did only come with the 4.3l v6 and 2.2l 4cyl.

The 4.3l is qood engine and share many parts with the sbc, There’s also some aftermarket parts for it but those may be some what expensive compared to the other american engines.

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NO!!! I see no problem using a Chev/Gmc S10 / Colorado 4.3l V6 4wd. Besides body rust up here, some have had rust through in the frame. I have been looking for a good one in my meager price range. I have been working with the 4.3 for years in a Blazer and most of all a full size 1/2 T truck. I had my version of an Imbert that worked quite well. Didn’t have a odometer on it so have no idea how many miles I ran it. I did drive it to Argos one year— 350 mi. one way. While putting in a new design, I put together a very minimal WK type gasifier. It’s performance was much superior to the Imbert. However, with in a couple hundred miles, emptied the fire tube and found erosion starting under the nozzles similar to what others have had. (changes are possible to correct this). I went ahead with my modified Imbert design and ‘‘gummed’’ up my engine. TomC

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Tom, Sorry about the “gummed” up engine. Did you get it freed up so it will run again? You can answer the question on your site.
Bob

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What is the difference between running on small or large pieces of wood?
How does it affect the aggregate?

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It’s easier for big blocks to bridge and make holes where tar can be made and get past.

And you do not want to have too small blocks as they will get too small when it gets down to the grate.

It’s my understanding anyhow.

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I don’t know anything about FEMA but on a WK. large wood will create a lose charbed and will allow oxygen to pass through and will mix with the gas in the crossover tube and the heat exchanger. The air in that hot zone will allow the gas to burn up so you will have very little power and very high rail temps. Wood that is too small will create a very tight charbed and will not allow much gas to pull through This will cause you to have very little power and you can even pull on the gasifier hard enough to pull air through gaskets and cause leaks. This Is the way I understand It.

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This is the beauty of the WK Gasifier, a mixer of large, middle, and small pieces of wood work great. Just chunk it up let dry, bag it and you are ready to go with the right size fuel. If it does get a little consipaied at the reduction area, a good hard pull of 25" to 30" of vaccum seems to clear it up on my truck.
Wood size of a fist and smaller is the best size.
Bob

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