Solar: the good, the bad, the cutting edge and the bare bones

I would have been happier if the guy wasted his time spouting off about all the details of the system. Literally all he did was take the bill, figure out the yearly use, calculated the cost over 20 years, which was 40k, then said we needed this system for 40k, and barely gave any details on the system. Showed us the roof solar exposure from nrel or google map. He didn’t leave a written quote. none in my email. basically all he said was write this down. Enphase IQ, and Q cell panels. I almost feel like the guy was trying to scam with no contract or written quote. And seriously the lack of information.

This was the kit which retails for 16.4k. plus you need wiring/conduit and mounting hardware and permitting. so figure 5k, and then 18k for labor.
https://unboundsolar.com/43008/enphase-24-panel-q-cell-grid-tie

I think because they are kind of a roofing company. They picked the absolute easiest system to install with the fewest electrical permitting issues. And enphase can do remote troubleshooting, and they outsource the electrical work.
Or possibly, they just get leads and take a commission from a 3rd party installer.

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there are a lot of bottom feeders in solar for sure. I hate roof installs
1)throw away 25% of your power due to overheating
2)Here anyways throw away $4000 for engineering, more expensive gear, municipal inspections
3)create a system that gets coated in snow and ice requiring cleaning and higher wear
4)make a system 10 times harder to fix down the road.
I have found that US prices seem inflated due to subsidies. I can get that system on a roof here for the same money in Canadian dollars so 25% less…
For storage the solark or the lux are probably both good choices. You would want to go lithium as both are having major issues with lead acid. Lithium is a waste for outage only but could make sense if your utility is planning on implementing time of use or peak pricing in the future…
Cheers, David

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