Life Goes on - Summer 2024

I knew, it helped to have the pipe to allow it to swivel, but does the copper work the best?

You guys are once again sending me down a rabbit hole. I have two places I KNOW there are lines but I don’t know exactly where they are buried. :slight_smile:

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I have gone back and forth in beliving this and currently im leaning in the beliving side :smile:

I have seen many times animals finding water rather quickly. Just the other day, kids made a tiny pool out of a hole in the ground and some foil. The next day there was a diver beetle in it. They cant fly and the nearest pond is about. The nearest still body of water is about 500 feet away so somehow he must of senced the water. Same l observed with a toad the other day. It went trugh hell of a lot of struggle to climb over some stacked boards just to get in to a water filled bathtub. Noway she kuld see water from below, somehow she senced it. I belive it might be wired in to us also.

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I have no idea if copper is better than anything else, it is a very good conductor but rubbish at magnetic stuff. On the other hand wood is rubbish at both and that works too, the only thing wood has going for it is that water is vital for trees to grow.
The swiveling in a pipe is just something I thought would help the process

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I think the body is whats doing the sensoring, the twigs or wires are just the needle on a guage.

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A bit exaggerated but if I was very sensory in tune with my body I perhaps could just stop walking when I feel there is something buried under my feet.
My brain still says Mumbo Jumbo :smile: But…

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And we probably were like that a long time ago. We got desensitived over time. And the inner voice became mumbo jumbo but strangely, l learned whenever l ignore myne, bad things happen. So l try and listen to it as much as l can and it has indeed prooven beneficial. Cant explain but perhaps some things dont need explanation.

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I have also learned the hard way to go with gut feeling most of the time. Especially my wifes gut feelings, those are more correct :smiley:

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I guess my senses are pretty numb :smile:
My grandfather’s advice comes to mind: - Believe half of what you see and nothing if what you hear :smile:

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That’s why it’s a matter of feeling JO. Your grandfather was right. “What you see” Compared to many four legged beings living around us we are visually retarded and truly see just a small range of the energy fields surrounding us. I have always paid attention to what my dogs find interesting. They see more with their nose than you will ever see with your eyes… " What you hear?" I make a blanket statement. Just about everything is a lie. History is entirely manipulated and opinions are like assholes. Everybody has one.

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Haha! Or milder - like an entire butt - devided :grin:

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We haven’t had a frost since April 26 and my tomato plants are getting root bound in their cups. Two weeks until our historically last frost date. No fool like an old fool. I’m thinking of doing something today that has bitten me in the ass many times.

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There a lot of Wisdoms in the old sayings:
TomH. “Hope springs eternal.” - Optimists do not even see so much failures - but opportunities to try again. (Ha! I am not so much an optimist.)
“Everything good I learned from my dog.”

Oh for sure some of us are very sensitive to minor forces. My Mother could not ever wear tick-tick mechanical watches. She would stop them. Only after LED and LCD watches came out with batteries forcing past her internal magnetism could she wear a watch.
Me . . . I cannot wear most metals and plastics against my skin. I will corrode them badly.
I cannot use touch screens or biometric fingers locks. No responses. The wrong responses.
So to me being sensitive-different is not a plus.
I’ll take rational thought, thank you.

Then . . . have to learn rational thinking can be a sucking-in hole down to “rationalizing” emotional driven desires. And calling them then rational decisions!
Rational thought and approaches are merely tools to use - not a god substitute.

The real trick of a good life is to use and balance out all capabilities into positives.
Hold yourself responsible to your own life. Tell Fate to go to hell.
Worship? Only one worthy for me: Will-Power. “If is to be, it is up to me.”
( Yes. Yes. I know this makes me sound self-centered, arrogant. Not really. I just refuse to live in the fear of an outside force. Or powerless to control my destiny)
Steve Unruh

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It is probably the best explanation, because it also explains why it doesn’t work for some people. I would think it would be related to ESP and 25-45% of the Western world has had some type of ESP experience.

https://goaskalice.columbia.edu/answered-questions/i-think-i-have-esp

Hi All,
Mine and the wife’s current “summer” pursuit is applying-for and qualifying for a foreign exchange student for the next September → June high school year.
I’ve had to write out, as retired what I do for hobby pursuits.
Just saying woodgas would require too much in-depth explaining. (short said - make me sound like a smoking wood, nut-case)
So I dug down into my decades of small scale energy generations experiences and answered as this, “As a strong believer in Distributed Power Generation I use my automotive career to work, develop and proof out small IC engine generators. All systems need times of the year generation gaps filling-in. And the alternative fuels to power these small IC engined generators. Working with IC engines and electrical generators is fun and easy for me.”
I’m having to write for approval from recent college educated and now J-1 visa program managing, degreed folk. And matured degreed working folk willing to sent off their own youth to a safe and experiences expanding home, far, far away.

And this is what Distributed Power Generation looks like applied out into the real world:

Not huge mondo wind farms distance feeding into a central; then distributing back out power grid.
I live at the top of a highest point, wind slope. With a tall house. With a tall shop building.
Had two time periods of changing storm fronts winds go through yesterday. Un-captured. Unharnessed. Totally unused. Except to put a few more trees branches down onto the ground.
Our surrounding growing trees are still the best solar energy capturing, converters, and storage for us here. Very DIY scalable.
As the tail end of the video says it is never about the on-paper maths efficiency. It is about actually doing something useable with what does surround you.
Regards
Steve unruh

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maybe, it I am undecided which incidentally, is probably one of the worst ‘undecided’ videos I have seen, it was extremely disjointed.

You will notice from the video, the original patents were filed in 2005, which means they run out next year. This might be one last hype to try and cash in on those which is my guess. There are probably 1000 small wind turbine patents that are expiring in the next 5 years.

The main problem as the video didn’t explain, is the avg wind speed is x, but the wind is only 33% of the time. When you get up 100m the wind is faster but also more constant or closer to 60+% of the time. A number of wind project in the US built in the 2005 era, were too short. A large number of proposed wind projects even in our area don’t have the high wind speeds at 100m for the 2-3c/kwh electric that you see east of the rockies, through the plains. It gets better at 110M but then you are pretty close to air traffic space. I think Europe has the extra 10M but I could be wrong. They can just mandate things faster without all the grandfathering laws.

It is probably a no-go in the US due to building codes and liability laws. You can’t even have the decorative bricks that stick out of buildings anymore because they fall out and hit people, and birds will nest on the ledges. But there are rules for HVAC placement as well.

I will stop there before I go on a rant about histerical committees and downtown redevelopment issues. :slight_smile:

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As always SeanO you miss the point of my post.
I am DIY.
I am a stong supporter and promoter of on-location DIY power generation AND then on-location use of your own local energy.

I do not have and refuse to have PV solar so far as I will not hog-trough into grid-tieing into the Grid to get the subsidies $$$$. From my local Grid supplier. From my State. From the Federal government.
Stand alone PV does not pencil out for me in comparison to the results of nurturing more trees, and trees harvesting.
A tall stand up wind turbine would get here flattened several times of the year here. Have to actually clear off trees to get any kind of reasonable clean air.
Micro-hydro WILL get me in big trouble with State water use-retention laws.

I am a bitter, bitter man about You-Musts Top-Down agendas by anyone now.
Fuck Big.
Fuck efficacy-maniac’ing solutions for others, financed by others. The GEKers approach to woodgas.
Damn man.
DOW is about DYI. Direct, plain, and simple.
Steve unruh

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As DIY, you can legally use the design in 1 year. let us know how it works for you!

You don’t have too. Solar plus storage pays for itself now. There is no reason to grid-tie, And certainly, you can grow trees, and use wood. It isn’t necessarily cost effective, and they look a lot nicer.

Speaking of trees, I have to go try to transplant a few hundred today.

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And the most important, not or but and that kind of energy. Pv wind and wood.

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Wind energy is really nice. But like real estate, it’s all about location, location, location. To show students how wind energy works, we put a little turbine on a former antenna tower on the roof of our building. I think it was 300 watts into 12 vdc, 600 watts at 24 volts. I ran it at 300w, 12v. After a a year of taking data, we put 17 kwh into the grid, equivalent to 57 hours of full output. Call it 2.5 days in 365. Call it $5 a year at high retail power rates. We had winds on the roof most afternoons, blowing from the coast at ~5 mph. That’s about 1/6 of rated wind speed. So the theoretical power is 1/(6x6x6), or 1/216, or about 1.5 watts. That would probably be enough to start the generator spinning, but not enough to get anything out of the grid-tied inverter. When the Santa Ana winds blew, there was plenty of wind power. Unfortunately, with fixed-pitched blades, you have to stall the rotor to keep things from flying apart, or toasting the generator. You can use variable pitch blades, but that system costs a lot more. You can triple the size of your generator, so you can handle the current for higher wind speeds, but that costs more too.

You need steady winds, preferably high winds, to make it practical. Those high steady winds may not be where you’d like to live. Steve’s use of wind power to harvest wood the easy way is about the best you can do most places :slightly_smiling_face: .

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Right, right, right. Back in the early '80s wind energy was the rage. I saw turbines put up everywhere, even in valley floors. One in particular that I often passed, I never saw spin. Turbine installers didn’t do any pre-sale wind monitoring to ensure a successful installation.

It was the same with solar. I once saw a photograph of solar panels deployed in a housing development. All of them were facing different directions. Apparently the installers were not trained and were told only to face the panels towards the sun.

Thankfully we have come a long ways, but there is still a lot of hype out there. There are some projects that should have never been done. One in particular is the floating solar farm that was recently destroyed by a storm. Tell me that couldn’t have been foreseen.

I am a strong believer in alternative energy where practical. But it is hard to beat a coal fired power plant for reliability.

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