Wood supply

Very impressive, bet it’s heavy :astonished:
Easier wood prep is always a plus. Watch those hands

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Up here PNW a feller is judged by his safety hinged cut.
None. You ain’t no feller.
Falling side wedged-out angle up into the felled tree . . . you an arborist, not caring about making “scale”. Scale is paid for board-feet at the mill buyers receiving end. They only pay the length of squared off saw/peeler logs.
J-I-C Steve unruh

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Post went to wrong topic …

Nobody gonna pay for that log anyway. Fact is, it’s hard to sell logs anymore… The tree linkers took over the industry. CHeaper to process I guess. Makes it hard for small scale guys. I could never make it logging the way I did when I was a teenager. You can sell prime stuff to local mills and the Welborn cabinet shop down the road a ways…

There isn’t any money in a wood lot here either. That is part of why I have a sawmill. The other part is it was just a great deal and I have barns that need alot of repairs.
I think there might be a market for hand made furniture from local wood. Something like that might be a way to make a little money through the winter when there isn’t field work to do. That is one of my long term goals don’t know if I will ever get there lately if I am not in the fields I am getting winter wood for heating or fixing a broken tractor. Too many things to do.

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I grew up and traveled the world with a close friend of mine. He used to climb mountains (big ones) Now he’s a tree surgeon. I used to work with him----now I just do his bigger mechanic work. Anyway…he’s not able to sell logs much and most of his logs get burned. He does some firewood, but there’s not a market that big. Now he has started a great little niche business. They make story books starting with the cutting of the tree through the milling, curing, and manufacturing process. They make finished furniture, cabinetry, and these big slab “live” tables. It’s a really high end market. Designers, and fashion consultant types bring their uber-wealthy clients to pay huge amounts of money for a table or whatever. The start-to-finish professionally published story book makes a huge difference. But that’s a really small market.

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That is the type of market I was thinking of this is a big tourist town all Boston people with money.
I think I could sell it through some speciality shops in town like you said the story is probably what makes the wood work sell.

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I think there’s a way to make some of those story book kind of things on Google+ but i am not a computer guy.

So, when he sells a table a book of how that table was made goes with it ? I’m thinking it would be heavy with pictures.

Yeah, like one of those books people keep on a coffee table for visitors to look at next to the book of pictures of seashells, and African drums, etc…Pics of each phase of the process with captions to describe what’s happening through the process.

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My current ocupation. Happening as l type :smile:
https://youtu.be/hLwMWBU42P8
Still not perfect thugh. Woorks good on beech and oak, but hazel, chestnut, alder do not work. Blades are too far apart and leave a few fibres that hold the chunks in a long sausage…

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I made a 4 way adapter for the log splitter. I wish I made the wings longer and maybe still will.

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That sure makes a nice uniform wood chunker, and fast indeed, wounder how large of branch it will safely too you and the machine can handle, either way you could clean up the city or country for fuel with that Gem just with branch’s in no time.Thats the idea we all had in the back of our minds, is the guy that built it selling any plans?Thanks kristijan.

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That rebak works good Kristijan! Small premium fuel for open road high speed performance :grin:
I see you bag up straight from the chunker. Do you always dry your fuel in bags like them? How do they handle UV-light?

Kevin,
We made the plans together but there realy isnt much to plan. its a wery simple design.
It eats up to 4cm thick limbs.
JO,

Green wood, yes. They dont show much uv deterioration althugh you can easyaly make a hole. They are practical thugh…

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Since Kristijan is having so much fun these days, I wanted some too.
I went down by the river last night and delimbed a small batch of young growth until the mosquitoes chased me home. This morning I went for another one up by the power line until the horse-flies chased me home to the rebak chunker.



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Looks like the bugs dont like wood preparation. I got chased by wasps yesterday :smile:

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Would like too visualize the plan some time, unless you are thinking of production lineing them.I would like too build one. Not close too that nice, but one that works good like that. I would’ent need any big tools too follow the tree trimmers for a while.just saw the 12" ones up for winter and trim the smaller branchs for fuel.i think all i need is a trim chain saw,and a tini chipper from tywon, i mean if i had that chunker.he he! ha ha.

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I wuld gladly give you (and all others) the plans, but the truth is l dont have any. I envited the guy that made it to come at my place sone time ago, we drunk a couple of beers and made some sketches. Thats more or less it.

The sketches are all based on JOs design. Dont be fooled with all the fancy bolts and frame, its a super simple machine.

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Hi Kevin,
I used no plans either. You can look at my thread


Even better search for Špalíkovač, Štěpkovač or Rebak on youtube and you´ll find lots of chunkers this type.

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