Woodgas to diesel question

Older Ferguson tractors had a Perkins engine with fuel injection into the vortex atrium, which was manufactured by the Serbian company Rakovica for IMT tractors. They have an interesting antechamber construction, half is in the cylinder head casting and the other half is disassembled, two screws are easily unscrewed and removed. For the purpose of winter ignition, I have already installed glow plugs here, but I could easily install spark plugs for the use of wood gas.

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I have a 1958 Massey Ferguson tractor. Four cylinder diesel. Been sitting, sinking into the dirt for about 15 years. The glow plugs are toast and I went to get replacements back then. Sixty five bucks a pop at that time. I bailed. How would you determine the right spark plug to use for that conversion? I think MSD has an ignition system that would time those plugs without having to have a cam gear or ECU. I’ll have to research that some.

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Hey TomH,
Just set up for a long reach 14mm gasketed spark plug with a wide range of available heat numbers.
Dial it in by useage.
S.U.

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Race car guys and other engine builders are always changing plugs for different conditions, compression ratios, fuel types…
Cold plugs are ideal for high rpm engines, forced induction applications, and other instances where the engine produces high operating temperatures. Conversely, hot plugs are good for applications that operate mainly at low rpms. Because they have a longer insulator nose length, heat is transferred from the firing tip to the cooling system at slower pace. This keeps the spark plug temperature high, which allows the plug to self clean and prevent fouling.

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Since we touched on the subject IV been meaning to ask, is there any benefit to running a hotter spark plug for woodgas?

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I am running a hotter good quality plug on my Dakota truck. Have not checked them in a couple of years.
Bob

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This is apparently a ready-made concept for a diesel engine from Belsrus, maybe our friends in the east know more. Should apparently be plug and play, but do not know for sure yet

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That looks like a pretty sweet setup you got going. I was driving home from work tonight and got to thinking about it ( I’m sure others have probably already answered on here). I wonder if the gas from the gasifier could be compressed and put in a high psi tank like a welding tank and use for a vehicle so you wouldnt have to keep the whole contraption in the bed of the truck. Would probably have to be condensed into a liquid first like propane though for that to be feasible.

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Only thing i dont like about what I’m seeing with diesel setups is you still need diesel so from a preparedness stand point maybe a gas engine would be better since your spark timing is already there basically just suck the wood gas into the intake. I would assume you just unplug your fuel injectors on a later model vehicle.

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Hey jan that looks like a nice setup. I know Belsrus has made tractors for many years.

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BTW nobody try that compressed gas idea it sounds like a good way to make a bomb if you didn’t do it right LoL.

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From a preparedness standpoint it is not hard to make enough of some sort of diesel to allow you to run mainly wood gas. Never put all your eggs in one basket.

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I started runing old frying oil straight in my diesels. No problem so far. Will see in winter…

Anyways, vegetable oil is at the moment 15% cheaper here thain diesel. Even if l burn it fresh its getting to be a bargain…

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Diesel works well on vegetable oil and also on used engine oil, the only problem is clogging the nozzles on direct injection engines. These nozzles have laser-drilled micro holes in the tip and need to be replaced when they become clogged.
Engines with an antechamber, say a 1.6 d VW, or a Mercedes 124 diesel, … these have nozzles with one large opening that cannot be clogged, and the injected fuel is well gasified in the vortex atrium, which is a condition for further combustion.
s-l400 (1)
s-l400
s-l400 (2)

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I did my senior project back in high school on bio diesel fuels I have forgotten much of it being 14 years ago but as I recall there are many ways to make it depending on the clarity and efficiency of the batch made. Fryer oil is a popular one around here for the 12 valve Cummins and 6.9 idi and 7.3 idi Ford guys. The mechanical injection systems lend themselves very well to oil based fuels not unlike the old school duece and a half multifuel engines. The thing that holds many people back from dabbling with biodiesel that I have seen is the same as woodgas: reduction on rubber meets the road horse power. Those older diesels I mentioned are far from efficient but proven long term performers. Not enough power and torque to kill itself but plenty to get the job done. I had a 1984 Isuzu pup that I swapped the 4cylinder gasser out for the complete c223 diesel running gear of a 1983 Chevy luv (bolt in swap) and ran it on any oil I could find. Great little truck, wish I still had it. 40mpg on fryer oil untreated just filtered another rig I never should have sold, reduction in horsepower yes, but I wonder if that could have been compensated with a diet of woodgas

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Hi Kenneth,
Thanks for kind words about my setup. It was a huge learning experience.
If you are going to compress gas I suggest you study up on CNG and LNG systems. The pressures and other factors involved are similar.
There are training programs for cng/lng conversion out there. The 'hub for that kind of thing seems to be Salt Lake.
*One more note: filtered ‘retort gas’ might be the way to go in this case, just because it has a higher energy density.
Rindert

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Just wire up a switch to turn them off. I have my 2011 GMC Sierra already wired up to shut off my fuel pump and injectors so it’ll be ready for a gasifier. You can also wire in a rheostat or PWM to trickle run gasoline when you need a little boost for a hill.

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Guys this pressurizing woodgas has been covered again, and again and again for neigh onto ten years here on the DOW.
Use the magnifying glass “search” top bar tool to read these topics and the back and forth’s.
I will not go over it again anymore. The info is there to find. Why-Not’s; No-Go pursuit.

Here is one found use-proof that will not BTU’s maths out.
In the same IC spark ignited generator loaded engines propane/LNG will give less watts than gasoline. Propane less than gasoline. Natural gas/methane will give a little bit less yet versus propane fueled versus gasoline.
And woodgas; charcoal gas; will give much MORE than a BTU prediction. Give power on the order of a natural gas fueled engine if done best practices.
This has to do with the power conversion dynamics of an up and down piston; connecting rod; to a crankshaft system.

I will emphasized again that gasoline, propane and natural gas are DELIVERED to the engine.
For use safety we mostly all engine suck the gasifer systems. That keeps most all of the will-leak-out poisonous carbon monoxide sucked inward into engine, burnt up safe. You are dealing with a 10-22% carbon monoxide produced blended fuel gas. Less than 1% open air will alter your perceptions. 1-3% kill you.
Now forced blowing the gasifier system all of the way through to engine delivery would relieve the engine power loss, eh, yah.
But every pin hole system leak . . . every port gasket will be spewing’s out poisonous carbon monoxide.
Propane and methane and carbon dioxide will asphyxiate you due to lack of oxygen uptake.
Gasoline vapors and especially carbon monoxide will blood poison you.
Never, never, never trade engine power and use convivence for use-safety.

Steve Unruh

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I agree 110% with Steve is saying here. We should never promote positive pressure storing or transportation of these kind of gases to run engines on this DOW site. It is always safety first for everyone and that means you too. Don 't be one of the (SSAD) people. Stubborn, Stupid, And Dead.
Bob

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You mean the gas from a TLUD for example?
More energy because of the tars ?

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