Good Eatin' and Whatnot

I felt like making a new post so everybody can share their favorite recipes. I’m always looking for new stuff to make with the same ingredients. It can also just be some tips and tricks to spice up a common meal.

Being part Irish I can definitely live off of potatoes. I am a machine that turns starch and potassium into harebrained ideas. I love potato soup. When the soup is almost ready I like to add a can of Cream of Mushroom Soup, a package of potato flakes, and a package of Dry Milk powder.

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Need to get Wayne’s cats head biscuit recipe moved from the Tomatoes in winter thread moved over here. :wink:

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This is the off topic area so maybe I won’t be boring anyone with our southern recipes.

It is three hours after breakfast and I’m still smiling.

Making tomato gravy is no different than making cantaloupe gravy .

Start with iron skillet with hot grease from cooking bacon or sausage . ( we didn’t have meat so the wife used coconut oil ) Add flour and brown, add diced tomatoes cook a little while and stir in milk ( doesn’t have to be fresh squeezed, store bought milk will do) and let cook to the right consistency.

Best if cooked on the ole wood stove but still great cooked on electric or gas.

Enjoy it poured over grits and eggs or a big cat head biscuit.

If any is left over ( which will be very rare ) be very careful of the disposal . If you just throw it out the dogs will get in a terrible fight and a possibility of losing a cat or two.

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Alex Tayloralextaylor62Premium Member

Feb '13

Cathead - n. Biscuit shaped into approximately the size of a cat’s head, placed in a greased, round iron skillet, and baked at 400 - 425 for approximately 20 minutes. Must have browned crust on both the bottom and the back. British equivalent is called a scone. Things generally called ‘biscuits’ which come from a ‘poof can’ are insipid slime and are useful for feeding nothing but a worm bed.

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Sounds delicious and I have never heard of it before

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You guy’s made me hungry, I think i could share an old recipe often made by loggers/lumbermen in the Swedish woods, i actually made it yesterday when we where out walking in the woods.
First of all one gotta use a sturdy frying pan with long handle, directly over open fire, use plenty of lard, or other grease, put in diced pork so it covers the bottom, fry til it starts to look little “crispy” there should be much grease left. Pour onto the pork and grease a mix of 5parts water, 4parts wheat flour, 1 part rye flour, 1 part barley flour, this could be mixed up at home, easy to bring in plastic bottles,
Pour the batter so it covers the pork and grease, fry until it settle so it can be flipped, fry some minute more.
In Sweden we eat this warm, with lots of lingonberry jam.
(Im not responsible for the healtiness of these caloric bombs :smiley:)
Fun fact; in sweden this is called: kolbullar, direct translated charcoal buns!
I though this excellent forum must be the right place for a recipe with this name?

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Sounds kind of like the Canadian bannock, but with more flavor. Specially if it’s salt pork, I know it is still heavily used in the big land of Labrador. Fried till crisp they call the pork “scrunchions” and most meals start with that flavored grease, usually followed by onions

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I looked up bannock, it seem’s more like bread to me?
This “kolbulle” is more like a heavy “pancake” with lots of grease and pork inside.
And yes, it should be salted pork, forgot to mention that. :blush:

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Thats the kind of food l run on! I will be trying it for sure. Soon!

Here, traditional loggers meal is Masovnik. Its made by slowly cooking half a pound of sour and half a pound of sweert cream, so long that the protein and the fat sepparate and it becomes nice and yelliw. Then its thickend with a spoon of corn flower and an egg. Scooped out of the bowl with bread. It will last you till supper.

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Can we keep this thread going I’m really enjoying this haha

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Dad made something pretty simple yesterday. Just ground beef, cheese, and sliced thin potatoes. Baked in a casserole dish it was good with dinner rolls like shit on a shingle. We watched Clint Eastwood’s “Cry Macho” while eating it.

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Not sure if the Europeans would understand what we mean by Shit on a Shingle, so here’s the recipe for the real deal.

I love Cowboy Kent Rollins’ recipes. His YouTube channel is very entertaining.

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Now that’s funny Kent Rollins is one of my favorites and he is playing on the big screen in the living room right now, making chicken fried steak fingers

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I too like Mr Kent a lot. I have learned a few things from him.

Specialy, he fueled my alrady well established love for cast iron.

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Absolutely, cast iron is my go to. Been around long before me and be here long after I’m gone. Timeless and make great gifts for people that appreciate them

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Rarey anyone does. It all nedes to be instant and idiot proof nowdays

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Kristijan the Slovenian Cowboy. Got a good ring to it.

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And it’s sad, people losing there mind when power goes out, stealing generators and gas, trying to keep life perfect and easy. Few people live the way we do and I would venture to say the majority of woodgassers see life for what it is. At times a struggle, but more then anything a journey. Enjoys the bumps and bruises and value the little things. I get a smile every time I crack an egg into a hot well seasoned cast iron skillet that was gifted from my mother in law she got from her dad in the 50’s. Now passed to me and feeding my children
Our water heater crapped out last week and we are moving this month. Landlord is going to demo the place when we are gone, I’m heating water for bathes and dishes by camp stove. The wife was freaking out, I didn’t bat an eye. I’m fine, lower power bill! Little propane used but eh not a big deal. If I had the means I would have a house just like yours Kristijan. A simple life in my eyes

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Growing up I lived next to my grand parents, on weekends I stayed there. For breakfast Grandma made buckwheat pancakes with liver pudding poured over them, I really liked it.

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I came across Kent Rollins’ YT channel when I was looking for what exactly was meant by “Cowboy Coffee”. Yessir, lots of great food and tales on 'thar!

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Kent’s coffee is the way I make it while camping, but good lord don’t let my brother make it on the campfire, the spoon doesn’t just stand up in the cup it jumps out and runs crying for his mama.
Tell ya what, a cup of his joe will have you wired for half the day during hunting season regardless of the terrain your hiking

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